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Unread 04-15-2015, 11:17 PM   #106
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Sometimes change is good. I'm changing a lot of parts now.

I dropped the drivetrain from the bellhousing on back. Not really hard to do.

To start off, I removed the exhaust system. As it's been off recently it unbolted easily enough at the manifolds, middle hanger and the hangers off the rear muffler. Lower it gently and it's done.

The clutch came out fine using the normal approaches. I braced open the pressure plate using three U-shaped pieces of coathanger drive in below the three shaft heads. Gotta tap out the three pins before getting to far into the process. All the bolts came off fine which surprised me. Not too much anger or curing needed to get them loose.

I also removed the pilot bearing and flywheel. For the pilot bearing I used a two-armed puller with one arm around the outside of the flywheel and the other into the middle of the bearing. Crank on it and the bearing comes out. Sort of unbalanced but it's not going back in. Removed the 9 bolts on the flywheel and it's out.

To get the transmission, I started with tying the transmission to the rear sway bar. The tie-down strap needed to be cut down as it couldn't take up all the slack. Hooked the ends to the swaybar on each side of the transmission and cranked it tight. Then I could unbolts the shocks and cradle. Unbolted the tops of the shocks and applied a jack to the middle of the cradle. Removed the six bolts holding the cradle to the body and the two tranny mount bolts and then lowered the cradle down.

I removed the tranny while bolted to the torque tube. That way the shifter mechanism doesn't have to be dealt with under the car. There are four bolts from the bellhousing to the torque tube. Removed those and could lower the front of the tube, then transfer the tranny to a jack, slide the whole mess forward, and lower the tranny past the cradle. It's kind of heavy to wrestle with but eventually it came out.

Then it's time for inspection, replacement and reinstallation.
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Unread 04-17-2015, 10:57 PM   #107
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Here are the new, reworked and used clutch parts.

I took the clutch apart and it looked OK, mostly. It was dragging a lot and I want to avoid that. The discs were a worn but still useable. Porsche doesn't give wear limits based on disc thickness but only on release arm position above a hole on the lower bellhousing cover. That's kind of lame.

So I resolved to refresh the clutch. The challenging part is that there's no clutch kit available and the individual parts are really pricey. I cobbled together what you see here.

I took the two discs and the flywheel in to a local brake shop. Got the flywheel ground and the discs relined. Together the discs cost about $600 new. (Really!) A relining was $120 for the two. $45 for the clutch. I had spotted a good looking intermediate plate on eBay. It looks new with no wear on the center "donut" or on the gears. Looks good. I also spotted a pressure plate there and got it for a bit less than retail.

For the throwout bearing, I used the one I pulled from my other 928 like 10 years ago. Back then the kits were available and I kept the parts. The one from the car was kind of sticky and crunch but the spare one turned nicely. The guide tube could have been replaced but at $80 I reused it. Got new alignment pins from McMaster-Carr for $10 for 25. I've got a lifetime supply.

The intermediate shaft looked OK. Much better than the spare I had.

Cleaned up all the parts and lubed them according to the manual. I've got a tube of the correct Optimoly for the intermediate shaft.

One thing I'm concerned with is that the relined discs are about 8.5mm thick while new ones are 8mm. I'm hoping the clutch will open wide enough. The hydraulics are self-adjusting. If not I've got spare, used discs to go in.
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Unread 04-17-2015, 11:05 PM   #108
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A problem with the clutch was the release arm pivot ball. When I was trying to get the arm off the stud I realized that the stud had come out of the bellhousing. The stud for 1980 uses a 6mm threaded stud. Later studs use an 8mm stud. The earliest cars use a 6mm press-fit. Something the later PET versions hide is all the obsolete parts. Sometimes they'll show superseded parts and sometimes just the latest replacement. This part only showed the one number and I hoped it'd work.

Ordered a used one from 928 International. The stud is a bit shorter. THe pic shows the original part with the cap still on.

Had to remove the upper bellhousing to fix this. The housing is aluminum and drills well. Gotta be real careful in getting it straight. Tapped for coarse 8mm threads and it screwed right in.
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Unread 04-17-2015, 11:17 PM   #109
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Since the whole clutch and the bellhousing was out I thought I'd try something different. Why not assembly the clutch to the bellhousing and put that in as a unit? Genius work? Well, not quite. It was a lot easier to lift the whole assembly into place, hook it onto the studs for the bellhousing and bolt it down.

With the alignment pins started it wasn't hard to tap them the rest of the way through the flywheel. That can be a headache.

What I didn't consider was putting in the upper bolts for the torque tube. Those were almost inaccessible. I could get a 1/4" ratchet and about 1 tooth of ratchet. Took a while to get the bolts snug and then I could get a wrench on it plus some 3/8" ratchet action. Had to alternate tools and ended up putting a jack handle on the 1/4" wrench to torque it down. Didn't bust it and it seems tight. I'll check when the clutch comes out next. That'll be when I pull the engine which should be inside the next year.

The second pick shows a detail of tapping the 3 "U" shims down a bit. The wires will touch the inside of the bellhousing otherwise and make it hard to turn the assembly.

Before putting in the clutch, the flywheel went on. I re-used the bolts and also put in used pilot bearing. I plan to replace the bolts and bearing with new when I do the engine.
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Unread 04-18-2015, 12:23 PM   #110
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With all that stuff off, it's a good time to shorten the broomhandle shifter. Not the prettiest work but the Sawzall has a mind of its own at times. I wish it was cut a bit straighter but it's not going to snap off.

The removed bit is in the foreground. I used a grinder to shape the top and the notches that hold the knob on. The new Borg-Warner transmission comes with a shifter where the rod axle tubes are a bit closer together. That's because less action is needed fore/aft for the tranny. The commercial "short shifters" use the same spacing as the older car's shifter handles so cutting the handle down, and swapping the tranny, made it just like the commercail versions. And I got to use my 2nd favorite tool: Sawzall!

Red is the fastest color. Yellow is second. The shifter is silver as that can was on the shelf and the Taurus wagon the paint was for is long gone. 4 kids => wagon. I didn't have a minivan, at least.
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Unread 04-18-2015, 12:28 PM   #111
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The tranny got attached to the torque tube out of the car. Much easier to get that foul boot back over the rear coupler. And to get the shifter lever back in. And to get to the upper two bolts on the torque tube. And to attached the shaft coupler. And to fill the transmission.

I've done a bunch of different things to fill them when in the car and this was far and away the easiest. Took the top off the tranny and poured in the four quarts. I'm using Mobil1 75w90 GL5 in the gearbox for now. Much cheaper than the boutique oils and I can always swap later it out if the shifting isn't good.
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Unread 04-18-2015, 12:40 PM   #112
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Re-installing the torque tube and tranny assembly wasn't so much fun. Installation may be the reverse of disassembly but disassembly was working with gravity and installation wasn't.

It took a lot of hefting, repositioning and jacking to get the mess back into position. I fashioned a sort of cradle out of wood scraps to hold the tranny as there isn't a flat spot on the bottom. I could finally get it onto the big floor jack and nurse it up and back, over the lowered cradle and into position. I strapped the tranny back to the crossmember and attached the torque tube to the bellhousing. (That took forever, see above)

The interesting ("interesting") part was getting the transmission mounts bolted up. As you can see below, the two mounts aren't the same but sure might be. The one with the hole in the middle was on the right side of the transmission. All transmissions from '80 use the same mounts don't quote me) and only the early transmissions use different mounts (do quote me). Those early versions had the battery mounted to the transmission and the mounts reflected that.

So... I had to lower the cradle and remove both mounts. Only one needed to be swapped. The bolts that hold the mounts to the transmission aren't easy to get at from under the vehicle. Got that done and everything lined up nice. It's interesting that the bolts from the cradle to the body have such low torque values for the size of the bolts. That's a good opportunity for some loctite, I think.
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Unread 04-19-2015, 11:33 AM   #113
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While I'm in there...

Time to put Koni's on the rear. The front has them. I got the fronts for free from a shop owner I know. Not sure of the history but they're tight. Now I want rears to match. The Boges were new but not as stiff and the car felt a bit odd. The springs are aftermarket parts. I've never figured them out exactly but I think they're 1st generation Eibachs and are single rate. I've tested them, informally, against stock springs and they're stiffer with thicker coils.

The long-term plan is to go with a 2.5" "Hypercoil" set-up. My other car has that. The assortment of available springs is huge so I'll be able to tune it as I want. For now I'm going with the stiffer springs and Koni shocks. I tracked my 1st car for years like that. I've penciled in the change to Hypercoils when I put in the S4 upper arms.
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Unread 04-20-2015, 09:19 PM   #114
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With the transmission out, I took the opportunity to install a bigger, 22mm sway bar. In addition, these cool brackets from 928 Motorsports and solid drop-link were added.

The brackets provide tie-downs that are unsprung and are great for tying down the car on a trailer and during dyno pulls. The brackets also provide 3 alternate mounting points for the link that give four effective stiffnesses for the swaybar.

I made the droplinks with parts from McMaster-Carr. The bolts at both ends are 10mm so four 10mm rod ends plus a meter of 10mm threaded rod makes two solid droplinks. Already had the nut for locknuts. I did the same thing on the front except that's all 12mm parts. (above)

The second pic shows the parts mounted on the left rear of the car. Notice that there are washers used to keep the rod end from binding against the sway bar and the lower bracket. There are two at the top and one at the bottom.
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Last edited by GlenL; 04-21-2015 at 07:55 AM..
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Unread 04-22-2015, 08:39 AM   #115
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great work Glen. Enjoy following this project!
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Unread 04-22-2015, 01:07 PM   #116
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It has come a long way. Glad to see it being restored. Anything special for the engine?
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Unread 04-22-2015, 09:31 PM   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carlege View Post
Anything special for the engine?
Nothing too special as I plan to race it in PCA stock classes. That means no changes from the base of the air cleaner to the exhaust manifolds.

I will be raising the compression a bit and using special top rings to deal with it. It'll be getting an Ishihara-Johnson windage kit to control the oil and deal with the oiling problem. Plus standard mixture and spark tuning for power.

I've got '85 exhaust manifolds and will run those into a stock dual-exhaust system. Someday I may upgrade to headers and a custom exhaust.
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Unread 04-23-2015, 06:05 AM   #118
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I'm enjoying the progress reports. Keep 'em coming.
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Unread 04-25-2015, 01:02 PM   #119
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Who knows how to have a good time? I do!

What you see here is "a good time." The Zombie had been in a moderate rear-end collision. The sheetmetal look to have a few waves in the sides and the floor of the trunk as well. It's probably why the hatch doesn't sit quite right, either. The really noticable part was that on bumper shock had collapsed so the rear wasn't straight and one bumperette was set in a bit further. So what to do?

I've got some spares of all types and figured that if I got the shock out I could slip the Euro-style or RoW (pictured) mount in. This calls for sawzall, doesn't it?

The initial plan of attack was to unbolt the shock from the body and the aluminum reinforcement beam, pull the shock out and slice it off behind the flange. That went fairly well...to a point. I could get the bolts out easily enough and brace the bumper beam out from the body. Then I could grab push the shock out, grab it with a vicegrips and saw it through.

The plan went reasonably well but the metal casing is tough. Took a while to get half was through and then....nothing. I'm doing this with the car lifted about a foot and a half so it's close and awkward under the car. Makes the time go slowly.

So what could be the problem? I tried a new saw blade but still not cutting through the middle. Let me turn it over and cut from the other side. Sure. Hard enough through the case but stops in the middle. Next step: cut all the way around and get the end off. This is hard as the mount can't really turn to all positions and be extended to get at the back of the flange. Turn, cut, turn, cut, get a new blade, cut...can't get it off.

To help with the access, I removed the beam from the other mount, and the bumperettes, so the beam could be pushed left-right for access. Then, I cut off the "ears" of the beam mount. That let it be turned more easily and get all the way around. I could finally get the outermost housing cut through to free up the mounting flange. And then get through the secondary housing. Pushing those apart I could see the inner piston sleeve which has some perforations. and inside, barely, I can see, maybe, another rod.

After three hours of this, I called it a night.

Got back to it on a fresh, crisp Spring morning and got where it needed to go. After cutting on it a bit more...and why not...it dawned on me that I might be able to sneak it over the beam and pull it out. That worked! Along that exercise the well-separated end came away from the rest of the body. Now I could see my nemesis: a rod holding the piston. Not sure what it's made of but there were a few slight cuts. Maybe a carbide or diamond blade would have made short work of the problem.

I got the end off and then pulled out the rest of the shock. The shock sticks back into a box section of frame and is not accessible except from the read end.

This meant it was now free-and-easy time...or could be. Putting in the RoW mount went OK. It just was hard to get the main mount-to-beam bolts it with the rear deformed a bit. It's all together now.

One thing I noticed is that the fluid in the shock evaporates fairly quickly. It doesn't smell like a solvent but the catch can was dry after two days.
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Unread 04-26-2015, 08:56 AM   #120
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Another job done. The gas tank is back in position along with the fuel pumps.

This was fairly tough to get right. I'm not sure what a stock installation looks like but there was no way to make it work "right."

As I've mentioned, the car was in an accident and the tank was moved out of position and that lead to it wearing through. Fixed that above. Looking the the cradle, it was really bent and didn't fit nicely over the tank. I should have a cradle but apparently it got launched. ("I'll never need this") Note to everyone: keep everything.

Bending the cradle back to fit on the tank was a challenge. When one part gets bent right something else needs readjustment. The pic shows the final result with new foam padding glued on. That's tool box liner about 1/8" thick. I'm not sure what it would do when exposed to gas but for now it's working well. Some 3M trim adhesive did the trick of binding it nicely. A lot of scraping and cleaning was needed to get reasonable bare and clean metal for that to work.

Putting the tank and cradle back was really hard. The first challenge was getting the tank into position and attaching the two vent hoses. There's a 3.8" that goes to the expansion tank that's not too bad. Then there's the "balance" line that tires the neck to the main tank. 14.5mm ID fuel line worked for that. Hard to get to the fittings to apply it and to tighten the clamps. To make it worse, I cut the hose too short and it needed more than half of the meter I bought. It's tight in there and I hope there's no problem or I'll have to drop the whole thing to fix it.

It seems inevitable now, but after bending the cradle to fit the tank the cradle didn't line up with the bolt holes. Better hindsight is that I should have checked that before installing the tank and the hoses. The rear-side two mounts have a slat between them meaning it won't just flex a bit, and it needed an inch. The biggest concern is that there was no way the cradle was going to mount all the way up and have it's strap ends tight to the body. Looking from the top in the hatch, the level sender was high up and reasonably centered in the access hole. What gives? Hopefully not the tank.

My solution was to grab a bunch of 10mm engine girdle washers and make stand-offs. Those washers are maybe 2mm thick each. The forward mounts got 2 washers each and the rears got 6. That's a lot of distance. The tank got held securely but not overly tight and the bolts are all cranked tight. Some loctite gives extra hope that it's going to stay.

I should add that the tank was previously held using some long (4"-5") bolts on the rear with the forward bolts tight. The PET shows 45mm (~2") bolts all around. I assume they're supposed to clamp the cradle completely to the body. The long bolts were driven in to the depth of the thread and the cradle hung down like 4" at the rear. WTF? The made the cradle hold the tank wrong and led to the chaffing and leak.

The fuel pump assembly went back nicely but the confounded cover fought me. The bolts that hold it corroded to the straps so I've rigged some 10mm bolts that can't be seen when being threaded. At least the newly painted cover looks nice.

Just the exhaust system and lower bellhousing left to put on. Then put in a couple of gallons of gas and fire it up. I'll be checking the clutch for correct play first. That'll be crucial.
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